Recent Fire Damage Posts

Holiday Fires

12/23/2021 (Permalink)

Holidays are here and the U.S Fire Administration has some facts we at SERVPRO of Napa County find really import to share:

  • One of every four home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.
  • Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious. On average, one of every 32 reported home Christmas tree fires results in a death compared to an average of one death per 143 total reported home fires.
  • A heat source too close to the tree causes one in every four Christmas tree fires.
  • The top three days for home candle fires are Christmas, New Year’s Day, and Christmas Eve.
  • Candles start two out of five home decoration structure fires.

In case of fire please call SERVPRO of Napa County at (707)226-2181

Fire Restoration Services

11/18/2021 (Permalink)

It’s always devastating when a family experiences a house fire, it spreads very quickly to valuables and other items can’t always be saved. SERVPRO of Napa County is experienced in fire mitigation and here to remediate your damages "Like it never even happened. ". Pack-outs are a vital component in the mitigation process as it allows for our team of highly trained technicians to restore your valuable belongs rather than relacing. While most mitigation work can happen on-site, SERVPRO of Napa County has the ability to take your precious belongings offsite, where we focus on specialized attention in cleaning each item, to restore it to its original form. Once your items have entered our facility, we assess the damages and choose which remediation approach. Disaster is unique, so our trained remediation technicians use a multitude of approaches such as ozone chamber , ultrasonic cleaning tank and many other methods.

If you need fire restoration services call SERVPRO of Napa County at (707)226-2181

Don't Be Helpless

11/10/2021 (Permalink)

In California, fire has become an expectation every year. However, this doesn’t mean we need to be victims or be helpless in the face of these events. Everyone can take a few simple measures to minimize or eliminate these disasters. Being prepared is the best first step to take. Here are a few preparedness steps you can take to help you to not be helpless.

  1. Remove overgrown foliage and other combustible materials from around your house and property.
  2. Have emergency supplies packed and ready when the time comes. Make sure that your emergency supplies contain a gallon of water per resident, food, and all needed medicines.
  3. Have and maintain fire extinguishers in the home, especially in the kitchen, garage, vehicles, and detached structures.
  4. Keep copies of all important documents in a safe and easily accessible location in case you need to leave.

Remember in case of fire damage call SERVPRO of Napa County at (707)226-2181

Preparing Your Napa Business for Wildfire Season

5/5/2021 (Permalink)

Businesses Have a Responsibility to Prepare for Wildfire Season

June through September are commonly when summer fires burn most fiercely. Wildfires can wreak havoc anywhere within California, and woodsy areas tend to be the most vulnerable due to the buildup of debris that rapidly catches fire. As with any natural disaster, business owners should develop a disaster recovery plan with the necessary instruction to keep businesses stable under extreme circumstances.

Develop a Wildfire Response Plan

A written wildfire response plan should be created and made accessible to all employees. Workers should be always aware of and familiar with the wildfire response plan instead of relying on it solely when a disaster quickly strikes. A plethora of copies of the wildfire response plan should be readily available when the unforeseeable happens. Employees should know the evacuation routes and practice traveling along with them. Be aware of the safest and secure location to retreat to if a wildfire burns and evacuation becomes necessary.

Maintain the Property

Scatters of natural debris can quickly start wildfires. Roofs, gutters, decks, alleys, and other areas around the property should be regularly cleaned of combustible materials, such as debris. It is important to note that dead vegetation should be immediately removed from the property.

Create a Defensible Space

Experts recommend fire scaping the property, which is otherwise known as developing a defensible property. The landscape should be structured strategically so that the disaster effect is lessened if a fire breaks out. Basically, the building is surrounded by less-flammable materials.

In fire scaping, near the business property are carefully picked, planted, and maintained to lessen the risk of combustion and diminish the rapid spread of wildfires. Fire smart plants with high moisture content and do not contain waxes, oils, or resins in their stems are ideal in fire scaping.

Protect Elevated Decks

Flammable materials should never be fixed underneath an elevated deck. Wildfires that happen have less chance to cause unrecoverable damage if the bottom of elevated decks is confined.

Close Vents

Attic and crawl space vents should be closed or safeguarded with a mesh screen to block flying ash from infiltrating the property.

Prepare a Disaster Kit

Businesses in high-risk wildfire locations benefit significantly from having a readily available disaster kit. At the least, the disaster kit should contain the following items:

  • First aid kit
  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • Cash
  • Water and canned food
  • Blankets
  • Battery-powered radio or technology to facilitate communication

Be Prepared for Alerts

Due to wildfire alerts being publicly broadcasted, it is essential to regulate how you and your employees will receive alerts and health warnings. Whether it is through public service announcements, smartphone alerts, social media, or air quality reports.

Fire Damage Restoration

When your business is overwhelmed by fires during wildfire season, immediate help is close by. SERVPRO of Napa provides reliable fire and smoke damage restoration services with a stellar reputation for rapid responses to emergencies in Napa County.

Our fire and smoke damage specialists at SERVPRO work quickly to restore the property to its pre-damaged condition. Soot is quickly removed from the property with state-of-the-art technology and advanced cleaning techniques.

Wildfires can happen anytime at a moment’s notice. SERVPRO of Napa County’s fire and smoke damage restoration professionals are available to the business and residential communities 24 hours a day and 7 days a week; for emergency and non-emergency situations.

Fire Damage Tips - Until Help Arrives

4/6/2021 (Permalink)

Fire damage to home When a fire is too big to clean by yourself, call SERVPRO of Napa County

Dealing with a fire in your home is highly stressful and can be a devastating experience. SERVPRO recognizes that residents are concerned about fire damage in their homes, and we are here to help 24/7, 365 days a year. In the meantime, we have some helpful tips for after a fire damage event before professional help arrives. 

What To Do After A Fire

  • Limit movement in your house to prevent soot particles from spreading into the upholstery and carpets until it is restored.
  • Change furnace filters.
  • Use gloves so you don't cause further damage upholstery, walls, and woodwork.
  • Protect your belongings by placing clean towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery, and carpet traffic areas.
  • If weather allows, open windows and doors for ventilation.
  • Empty the freezer and refrigerator if the electricity gets shut off, and prop doors open with rolled towel or newspaper. Discard opened food packages as they could be contaminated.
  • Remove pets to a clean air environment.

What NOT To Do After a Fire

  • Start to clean or wipe residue from walls, ceilings, and other surfaces.
  • Use or try to clean carpets or furnishings impacted by smoke residues or debris until they are professionally cleaned.
  • Toss food items or canned goods that were exposed to heat or fire.
  • Turn on the water, electricity, and gas until professionally checked. 

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is slightly different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for specific conditions. SERVPRO of Napa County has the equipment to restore your fire and smoke damage. We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions About Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage? Call Us Today - (707) 226-2181

3 Ways To Avoid Fire Damage on Your Property

4/6/2021 (Permalink)

Your home is supposed to be a place of comfort and a sanctuary where you make memories and build your life. That is the reason why it is frightening to imagine your home ever suffering from a fire disaster. Although you can't control everything, here are some steps you can take to help reduce the risk of fire and smoke damage.

1. Smoke Alarms

If you don't already have a smoke detector or alarm, it's time to get one installed. These alarms are your best defense when it comes to minimizing fire damage. If you already have one, ensure you are checking it regularly. Test the batteries once a month and replace the system every ten years. Make sure you have an adequate number of detectors on every level if you have more than one floor in your home or business.

2. Fire Extinguishers

Choose a fire extinguisher that will correspond with your needs. They must be easily accessible, light enough to handle, and family members or employees are trained to use them.

3. Kitchen Incidents

Cooking equipment is often the cause of home fires and injuries. It's essential to be mindful while cooking in the kitchen, not only with how you cook but also leaving cooking surfaces unattended and appliances left on.

How We Can Help

Smoke and fire damage is best dealt with by professionals; they understand the complicated chemical interactions involved with soot and fire. The best thing to do is get in touch with SERVPRO of Napa County as soon as possible. We will assess your property and come up with a fire damage cleanup plan.

Have Questions About Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage? Call Us Today - (707) 226-2181

Tips for Residential Fire Safety

12/22/2020 (Permalink)

We all want to keep our family and property safe from dangerous, deadly fires. But do many of us take time to ensure that we, in fact, are safe? Take time to employ these 8 tips for residential fire safety to keep your loved ones and pets out of harm's way.

Avoid Hazards - One of the best ways to prevent residential fires is to avoid certain habits and practices that can lead to blazes. A tried and true rule to always follow is to place all lighters and matches in high areas away from a child's reach. Also use caution when burning candles in the home and teach your children that both matches and lighters are not toys to be played with.

Have a Plan - Have a plan for you and your family on what to do if a fire does occur. Make sure to vary the plan based on where the fire occurs and what type of fire it is. When you have your strategy in place purchase the needed safety tools (IE. fire ladder, fire extinguisher) and place them in the designated areas. You will also want a plan on how to practice your skills to maintain your fire tools such as when to perform a fire extinguisher inspection.

Practice Your Plan - Having a plan in place in the event of a fire is only half of the job. In order for your family to be safe, they must feel comfortable on executing the plan. Take time to practice a fake fire in the home so every family member can rehearse the plan. It may be beneficial to do varying scenarios so that different approaches can be made.

Inspect Your Equipment - Make sure to perform a fire extinguisher inspection on a regular basis to ensure it is in proper working order.

Hire a Chimney Sweep - Have your chimney swept by a professional on a yearly basis preferable before the heating season. Creosote can build up in the flue leaving your chimney vulnerable to a fire.

Educate Yourself - Educate you and your family on basic fire safety skills. There are many educational books geared to children that cover the topic empowering them to make wise choices in the event of a fire in the home.

Alarm Your Home - Always have both a smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector on each floor of the home. Test both regularly and replace batteries as needed. Carbon monoxide detectors often have an expiration date. To help me remember when the date is approaching, I used a black permanent marker to write the date on the bottom of the unit facing the floor so anytime I look up I can clearly see if the unit is near expiration.

Be Smart - Common sense can go a long way in overall fire safety in the home. Make sure you know the basics of how to protect you and your family from home fires. Also teach your children how to approach fire hazards using good judgment and practical knowledge.

Follow these residential fire prevention tips to keep your family and home safe from a dangerous blaze. Performing a fire extinguisher inspection, sweeping your flue, and the other six tips are all important to maintaining a nontoxic environment for those you love to work and play in.

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

11/19/2020 (Permalink)

The kitchen is the source of many fire hazards because it's where heat, electricity, water and grease come together.  The most common type of fire is the grease fire.  A grease fire is extremely dangerous as it can get out of control quickly and spread from the stove throughout the kitchen and into other rooms of the house.

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

  • Too high temperature in the fryer
  • Vegetable, more flammable, oils
  • Old, more flammable oil, in the deep fryer
  • Fat deposits in the flue and ventilation ducts
  • Misalignment sprinklers due to equipment moved around
  • Clogged melting links of the sprinklers leading to impaired function

Other types of kitchen fires include oven fire or the microwave.  When a fire starts, keep the door closed and turn off the oven.   The lack of oxygen will suffocate the flames. If continues to smoke like a fire use a fire extinguisher or call fire department.

At SERVPRO of Napa County we are available 24 hours and 7 days a week.  Give us a call at (707) 226-2181.  We can help make any fire damage you are facing and make it, "Like it never even happened."

Where to Begin After a House Fire

11/17/2020 (Permalink)

Of course, the most important thing to do after any size fire is to have the home inspected for safety. There may be hidden damage to electrical wiring, wall supports, and foundations that should be corrected before cleaning and finishing cosmetic touches like painting walls. The inspection may be conducted by the fire marshal or by a representative of your insurance company.

 Once the site is cleared as safe to enter, you'll still need to take precautions before heading in to document the damage. Adults should be wearing close-toed shoes, long-sleeved shirts and long pants, safety glasses, and work gloves. It is best to wear face masks and keep small children away from the damage. SERVPRO of Napa County is always ready to help and assist you with any fire damage questions.  Please call us at  (707) 226-2181

Tips for Residential Fire Safety

5/5/2020 (Permalink)

We all want to keep our family and property safe from dangerous, deadly fires. But do many of us take time to ensure that we, in fact, are safe? Take time to employ these 8 tips for residential fire safety to keep your loved ones and pets out of harm's way.

Avoid Hazards - One of the best ways to prevent residential fires is to avoid certain habits and practices that can lead to blazes. A tried and true rule to always follow is to place all lighters and matches in high areas away from a child's reach. Also use caution when burning candles in the home and teach your children that both matches and lighters are not toys to be played with.

Have a Plan - Have a plan for you and your family on what to do if a fire does occur. Make sure to vary the plan based on where the fire occurs and what type of fire it is. When you have your strategy in place purchase the needed safety tools (IE. fire ladder, fire extinguisher) and place them in the designated areas. You will also want a plan on how to practice your skills to maintain your fire tools such as when to perform a fire extinguisher inspection.

Practice Your Plan - Having a plan in place in the event of a fire is only half of the job. In order for your family to be safe, they must feel comfortable on executing the plan. Take time to practice a fake fire in the home so every family member can rehearse the plan. It may be beneficial to do varying scenarios so that different approaches can be made.

Inspect Your Equipment - Make sure to perform a fire extinguisher inspection on a regular basis to ensure it is in proper working order.

Hire a Chimney Sweep - Have your chimney swept by a professional on a yearly basis preferable before the heating season. Creosote can build up in the flue leaving your chimney vulnerable to a fire.

Educate Yourself - Educate you and your family on basic fire safety skills. There are many educational books geared to children that cover the topic empowering them to make wise choices in the event of a fire in the home.

Alarm Your Home - Always have both a smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector on each floor of the home. Test both regularly and replace batteries as needed. Carbon monoxide detectors often have an expiration date. To help me remember when the date is approaching, I used a black permanent marker to write the date on the bottom of the unit facing the floor so anytime I look up I can clearly see if the unit is near expiration.

Be Smart - Common sense can go a long way in overall fire safety in the home. Make sure you know the basics of how to protect you and your family from home fires. Also teach your children how to approach fire hazards using good judgment and practical knowledge.

Follow these residential fire prevention tips to keep your family and home safe from a dangerous blaze. Performing a fire extinguisher inspection, sweeping your flue, and the other six tips are all important to maintaining a nontoxic environment for those you love to work and play in.

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

4/15/2020 (Permalink)

The kitchen is the source of many fire hazards because it's where heat, electricity, water and grease come together.  The most common type of fire is the grease fire.  A grease fire is extremely dangerous as it can get out of control quickly and spread from the stove throughout the kitchen and into other rooms of the house.

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

  • Too high temperature in the fryer
  • Vegetable, more flammable, oils
  • Old, more flammable oil, in the deep fryer
  • Fat deposits in the flue and ventilation ducts
  • Misalignment sprinklers due to equipment moved around
  • Clogged melting links of the sprinklers leading to impaired function

Other types of kitchen fires include oven fire or the microwave.  When a fire starts, keep the door closed and turn off the oven.   The lack of oxygen will suffocate the flames. If continues to smoke like a fire use a fire extinguisher or call fire department.

At SERVPRO of Napa County we are available 24 hours and 7 days a week.  Give us a call at (707) 226-2181.  We can help make any fire damage you are facing and make it, "Like it never even happened."

Pets can cause a fire

4/15/2020 (Permalink)

  • Pets are curious. They may bump into, turn on, or knock over cooking equipment. Keep pets away from stoves and counter tops
  • Keep pets away from candles, lamps, and space heaters.
  • Always use a metal or heat-tempered glass screen on a fireplace and keep it in place.
  • Keep pets away from a chimney’s outside vents. Have a “pet-free zone” of at least 3 feet (1 meter) away from the fireplace. Glass doors and screens can stay dangerously hot for several hours after the fire goes out.
  • Consider battery-operated, flameless candles. They can look and smell like real candles.
  • Some pets are chewers. Watch pets to make sure they don’t chew through electrical cords. Have any problems checked by a professional.
  • Have working smoke alarms on every level of the home. Test your smoke alarms at least once a month.
  • If the smoke alarm sounds, get out and stay out.
  • Never go back inside for pets in a fire. Tell firefighters if your pet is trapped.

If you experience fire damage don't hesitate to call SERVPRO of Napa County.  We always ready to help.

Call us at (707)226-2181

Make Sure to Water Your Christmas Tree

12/24/2019 (Permalink)

A lighted Christmas tree in the background with a red ornament on the right with an image of pine trees. Merry Christmas!

According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), between 2013-2017, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 160 home fires that began with Christmas trees. Although this can happen, you can reduce the rate of fire by simply watering your trees daily. A dried up tree can completely be engulfed in flames in a matter of seconds, whereas, a watered tree can buy you some time since the rate of increasing flames is lower. Therefore, this year and next year be sure to water your Christmas trees to avoid any sudden disasters. 

This Christmas and Holiday season please be safe and thank you from your friends at here at SERVPRO for a wonderful year. 

Merry Christmas to all and to all a Happy New Year! 

Ten Things I Needed During a Power Outage

11/20/2019 (Permalink)

The number ten in big black bold font inside of a yellow circle background. Top Ten!

What I Needed During a Power Outage

October was full of unpredictable circumstances. The Kincade fire grew at an exponential rate and endangered our neighborhoods. PG&E had to take drastic precautionary measures by shutting off the power lines to around a million residents of both Sonoma, Napa, and Marin county. Fortunately, we had government support through a declaration of National Emergency which led to the dispatching of firefighters from neighboring cities, counties, and states. These brave people contained the fire and prevented major catastrophe.

The outage was an unfortunate circumstance and there were specific items that I wish I had in my possession to make the experience easier. The next time an outage occurs I want to be prepared and share with you the top ten essential items I needed during a power outage.

Top Ten List:

  1. First Aid Kit: Safety first!
  2. Powered Portable Charger(s): Cell phones or laptops are essential for daily living. Having a communication device during an emergency can be a lifesaver. Also, passing the time online when there is no power can make the process easier.
  3. Batteries: AA, AAA, or a backup battery are useful to power items that require them. Such as a flashlight or have in case you possess items that require batteries. Such as a flashlight, clocks, or radios.
  4. Flashlight: A flashlight is important for visibility at night. During a power outage, it can be difficult to move around. While I recommend having a LED flashlight, any normal light is useful to have.
  5. Gas: During the outage, many people had informed me that they were low on gas and therefore confined to their area until the power came back on or until someone can help them get to a gas station with power to be able to transfer gas back to their vehicles. Having a car filled with gas can also be essential for rapidly evacuating during an emergency.
  6. Cooler: The first thing I thought about during the outage was whether my food was going to spoil since our refrigerator was no longer running. Having a cooler could have erased this worry by transferring the food that would’ve spoiled without refrigeration. Of course, having a cooler alone won’t work in the preservation of your food.
  7. Manual Can opener: Can openers can be a huge aid when you need to open your non-perishable foods.
  8. Ice: This is the trickiest item on the list to have since a fire and outage are unpredictable. Ice does not have a long-life span as it melts easily and without refrigeration or a permanent cold environment, ice is a valuable resource that one needs to get an upper-hand when buying since it is the first thing to go at the grocery stores.
  9. Canned Food or Non-perishables: Being that food is a necessity for survival. Having food that does not perish without electricity can determine life or death. Well at least, that you don’t spend the days starving at least. Food includes: bars, nuts, candies, peanut butter, chips, beef jerky and much more.
  10. Bottled Water: The most important resource to have access to during a crisis. Preferably not stored in plastic but only if needed. Just make sure you don’t leave the bottles unattended in the car with sunlight directly hitting them.

Disclaimer:

This list is intended for short term emergencies and everyone has different needs therefore different priorities. That was my list of ten things I needed during the power outage. Hopefully, it helps. 

Brought to you by SERVPRO® of Napa County

How to Clean A Fire Damaged Home

11/18/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO professional front center holding a broom. Duplicates of him to the left and right side cleaning the roofs from smoke HERE TO HELP!

A fire can have a detrimental effect on one’s life. Costs for repairing or fixing can be astronomically high depending on your insurance plan and provider. However, if the damage is small enough, here at SERVPRO of Napa County, we would like to share with you some restoration tips for a more cost-effective approach. The information provided can also be viewed in more detail by accessing the American Red Cross website.

First thing you’ll need is safety gear. I cannot emphasize the importance of this enough. The chemicals used in this process are caustic and will harm you if used incorrectly. Safety gear includes: rubber gloves, aprons, heavy soled shoes, and nose masks or face protection masks. Place a canvas drop cloth to protect the floor from getting stained further. Meanwhile, ventilate the area with a fan.

While wearing rubber gloves, measure 4-6tsps of tri-sodium phosphate with 1 cup of household bleach for every gallon of warm water used for cleaning or you can use a mild soap or detergent to remove soot and smoke from walls, furniture, and floors.

*Make sure you test surfaces to ensure that bleach solution will not cause discoloring. To conduct this test, wipe a small area of the surface with bleach and allow it to dry for 24 hours.

Wipe the walls using a chemical dry-cleaning sponge. Wipe the walls slowly and carefully. Whenever the sponge becomes saturated with soot or smoke, wash and let it dry before you continue. Repeat this process until most of the soot is removed. To get the best results, make sure you wipe the walls from top to bottom and side to side. There might still be stubborn stains on the wall. In this case, you can use either a paint thinner or rubbing alcohol to gently rub over the walls until the stubborn stains are gone.

Wipe leather goods with a damp cloth and dry cloth. Use newspapers as stuffing for your purses and shoes. Leave suitcases open. When the leather dries, wipe it clean with a saddle soap. Rinse leather and suede jackets in cold water and then leave to dry.

*Leather goods should be dried away from any heat or sun.

Follow public health guidance on safe cleanup of fire ash and safe use of masks. Also make sure to wet debris down to minimize breathing harmful dust particles. If you have an older home, please consult with a professional to avoid any asbestos inhalation as well.

SERVPRO® franchise professionals are leaders in fire and water cleanup and restoration.

Kitchen Fire Safety

5/6/2019 (Permalink)

Kitchens are a natural place for fires to start: you are already working with open flames or very high heat. Take extra precautions to prevent fires.

Preventing kitchen fires

The number one cause of kitchen fires is unattended cooking. When cooking anything on top of the stove, or in the oven, stay with it. For long-cooking dishes, plan activities you can do in the kitchen, such as cleaning or preparing other dishes. If "kitchen activities" don't come to mind, consider reading, writing, chatting with family or friends, or even reading a story to the kids. All of these can keep you happily and productively occupied while keeping an eye on what is being cooked.

If you cannot or don't want to stay in the kitchen:

  1. Check frequently on food that is cooking,
  2. Have a working smoke alarm installed where it can warn of potential fire.
  3. Keep a fire extinguisher within easy reach.

Kitchens can be very active places, especially when meals are being prepared. These basic tips can increase your safety:

  1. Wear short-sleeve, close fitting clothing when cooking. Loose clothing can more easily catch fire.
  2. Watch children closely in the kitchen. Teach them fire safety and proper handling of tools to prevent burns, cuts, or other injuries. Do this before you teach them to cook. Stay with children for every step as they are learning to cook. Reinforce and praise their safety skills.
  3. Grease can accumulate quickly in the kitchen. Grease fires can quickly spread to the entire kitchen. Clean your cooking surfaces and counters frequently to prevent food and grease build-up. Ideally this should be done immediately after cooking, or during clean-up after each meal.
  4. Keep flammable materials, such as curtains, towels, pot holders, plastic or paper bags, away form cooking surfaces.
  5. Store all solvents and flammable cleaners well away from all heat sources. Never keep gasoline or kerosene in the house, especially not in the kitchen.
  6. While cooking, make sure pan handles are turned away from the front of the stove so that no one will accidentally bump them. Boiling water or hot grease thrown from a jostled pan can cause severe burns. Keep the area in front of the stove clear and calm while cooking.

Putting out a fire

Even with the greatest care, you may someday have to put out a kitchen fire.

First, assess the danger. If the fire has spread beyond the oven or a pan, call the fire department right away. In most locations, you can call 911 and they will transfer you to the needed service.

If the fire is small and contained, as in food flaming in a pan, these tips may help:

  1. Slide a pan lid over a grease or oil fire to smother flames. Turn off the heat. Watch carefully to make sure the fire is not spreading somewhere unexpected. Leave the lid in place until it cools. Once the fire is completely out and everything is cool, thoroughly clean everything that was involved in the fire, especially the stove top or oven. If the flame got outside of a pan, you will need to decide whether there was any damage that must be repaired before you can cook again. Caution: Never attempt to carry a flaming pan outside. Doing this increases your risk of spreading the fire and of being burned.
  2. Keep a large box of baking soda on hand. Aside from its other uses, you can pour baking soda over most small food fires to extinguish the flames.
  3. Never use water or flour to put out fires. Water added to a grease fire reacts violently, sending hot grease everywhere. This spreads the fire and increases your chance of being burned. Flour can have a similar effect. Water poured on flames can also get into electrical circuits in the stove or oven, which can complicate the situation and increase the danger.
  4. If a fire occurs in your oven, keep the door shut and turn off the heat. This will usually smother the flames without further risk.
  5. Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen. There are several types of extinguishers, each designed for use with specific kinds of fire. Make sure you have the right kind; one that can put out grease-based fires most often found.



Article Source:

https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Judy_Downing/93332 

Why You Should Hire Professionals for Your Fire Damage Repair

4/12/2019 (Permalink)

As a homeowner, there are few things that are worse than being hit by a fire. The damage that can be caused by a flood or other disasters are less when compared with that caused by fires. With other forms of disasters you can still do some repair, but with a fire the damage could be total, even if you are lucky enough to escape with your life.

Even if the fire that affected you was not a full blown one, the damage and trouble that it could cause can still be substantial. It is also not easy to repair the damage that it can cause. It presents some complications that makes handling it rather difficult.

Why Fire Damage is Difficult to Take Care of- As mentioned, a fire causes some damage that are particularly tricky to take care of. It might burn just a portion of a room, but the repair would have to involve the whole place. The smoke could also cause grime to appear on the walls and the ceiling, which could render the place a total waste.

Making use of ordinary cleaning methods will not work in removing the marks from the fire and the smoke. Leaving parts of the house that were only partially damaged by the fire can also be dangerous, since you can no longer trust its strength.

DIY Fire Damage Repair- Still, there are those who insist that they can handle the repair of the damage caused by a fire in their homes on their own. If you feel confident that you can handle it on your own, and that you have enough skill and knowledge, then go ahead and clean up your own place.

Professional for Fire Damage Repair- There is a special type of contractor that specializes in handling damages from fires and other disasters. If you are thinking of hiring someone to take care of the fire damage in your home then these specialists are the ones to go for.

Fire and Water Damage- It is not only the fire that causes the damage during a fire. The water used by the firemen to put it out can cause damage to your property and the house itself. The water can cause mold build-up which is something that you should avoid at all costs and professionals would need to have the right equipment to take care of that.

Safety- Another reason why it is beneficial for you to hire professional fire damage cleaners is your safety. When you do your own cleaning and repair on a fire damaged house you might be unable to assess if the place is already safe and you could be putting yourself in harm's way. Contractors would be able to assess the condition of a building based on their knowledge and experience.

These are just some of the reasons why you should go for hiring a contractor in order to do fire damage repair. The good news is that there are many contractors offering this type of service now. You should be careful about signing with just anyone because you have to be sure about the service that they could provide first.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7279682

Addressing Fire Damage - Simple Tips To Do To Clean Up After a Fire

4/12/2019 (Permalink)

Fire damage is undeniably one of the most dreaded problems that could be experienced by any household. It is devastating, destructive, and it leaves marks that will remind you of the fateful events. For someone who experienced fire, the safety of family and pets comes first before your personal belongings. However, fixing smoke, fire damage together with water damage is a reality that you have to deal with once the whole estate has been put off from the smoldering disaster. In such situations of damage cause be fires be it a small incident or a catastrophe, it is important to know the ways to address the problem. It could be wise to get a contractor to do the task for you but for small and isolated problems, it is also important to know what to do to dry out the place, remove the fumes and restore the area to its regular self.

Prior preparation
Before making any clean up on the affected area, be sure that the fire marshal has already given you a go signal to enter the premises. The firemen should put off all fires, even burning ash can be a reason for new fires. You might want to call your insurance company also while on the waiting stage in order to have your damage assessed and see how much the coverage will be for the damage incurred on your property. Do not move anything until the insurance people are able to take pictures to serve as evidence. If you remove something or misplace anything, it might lower the appraisal value. Check also the electrical wiring. You can hire an electrical contractor to check the wires, outlets and switches if they were affected by the fire.

Start cleaning
If you are ready to address the fire damage, get started by wearing safety products like gloves and masks. Open the windows to let the smell out and let the fresh air in. take out all items that could result to mildew build up. For the water damage, if the damage is really very minimal like the stove top only or the cabinet, use a clean, absorbent mop or cloth to dry out the excess water. If the damage is too much for a cloth use a wet vac to suck all the water effectively. Since the smoke and fire can cause they are to smell, disinfect the area.

Clothing, drapes and carpets
Smoke can leave spots on fabric and it could leave nasty odors. Take them all out and wash them with a strong detergent. This will help in removing the odors. Anything that has been burned can be thrown away.

Washing the house off
While the place is still wet, take advantage of the moisture and wash the walls with a very mild soap. This is an important method to prevent the buildup of mold and mildew. Once the whole area has been cleaned but still is mildly wet, use an air blower to dry it out fast. If you have a dehumidifier, set up the equipment to the right humidity levels and let it take the extra moisture. This will also prevent the formation of mold and mildew.

Fixing fire damage is a very serious and rigorous task but you can still do on your own if you wanted to but be sure to do it fast so that microorganisms will not thrive. It might also be necessary to get a fire and water damage restorer to recover the house in no time, make it fresh smelling again and minimize the spots that remind you of that fateful moment.

Copyright 2011 water-damage-guide.com, all rights reserved.

Mark is the editor Water-damage-guide.com which Provides you with news, tips and articles on all kinds of water damage restoration services. For more info about Fire water damage or Water damage Repairs please check our website.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6130558

Napa County Smoke and Soot Cleanup

12/27/2018 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Napa County will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – 707-226-2181

Facts about Holiday Fires

12/12/2018 (Permalink)

Holidays are here and the U.S Fire Administration has some facts we at SERVPRO of Napa County find really import to share:

  • One of every four home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.
  • Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious. On average, one of every 32 reported home Christmas tree fires results in a death compared to an average of one death per 143 total reported home fires.
  • A heat source too close to the tree causes one in every four Christmas tree fires.
  • The top three days for home candle fires are Christmas, New Year’s Day, and Christmas Eve.
  • Candles start two out of five home decoration structure fires.

Content Source:

https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/holiday.html

Is Cooking Dangerous?

12/6/2018 (Permalink)

The answer is NO! But cooking is the number 1 cause of fires in homes.

We all love a good meal and with the Holidays coming we hope you all have great meals coming out safe of your kitchens. We brought you information about how to be even safer.

First most fires in the kitchen are man-made, so keep an eye while in the kitchen. here are some safety tips:

House fires happen most during dinner hours—between 5:00 and 8:00 p.m.

  • For grease fires, only use a fire extinguisher (class B) or baking soda. Do not use water! It will spread the oil/grease and make your fire worse.
  • Never leave your food unattended. Fires only need 30 seconds to go from a small flame to an out-of-control blaze, so even going to the bathroom could endanger your home.
  • Turn off the stove and all appliances once you’re done cooking.
  • Keep everything off hot surfaces. For instance, don’t throw a dish towel on top of the stove, because it could still be hot!
  • Don’t wear baggy clothing. It could catch fire accidentally.
  • Keep the grill at least 10 feet from vegetation and the house.

And remember, we at SERVPRO of Napa County are here to help in case of emergency to make it "Like it never even happened."

Content source: 

https://www.safewise.com/blog/the-most-common-places-that-fires-occur-in-the-home/

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

5/11/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Napa County (707) 226-2181

The kitchen is the source of many fire hazards because it's where heat, electricity, water and grease come together.  The most common type of fire is the grease fire.  A grease fire is extremely dangerous as it can get out of control quickly and spread from the stove throughout the kitchen and into other rooms of the house.

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

  • Too high temperature in the fryer
  • Vegetable, more flammable, oils
  • Old, more flammable oil, in the deep fryer
  • Fat deposits in the flue and ventilation ducts
  • Misalignment sprinklers due to equipment moved around
  • Clogged melting links of the sprinklers leading to impaired function

Other types of kitchen fires include oven fire or the microwave.  When a fire starts, keep the door closed and turn off the oven.   The lack of oxygen will suffocate the flames. If continues to smoke like a fire use a fire extinguisher or call fire department.

At SERVPRO of Napa County we are available 24 hours and 7 days a week.  Give us a call at (707) 226-2181.  We can help make any fire damage you are facing and make it, "Like it never even happened!"

FIRE SAFETY IN MANUFACTURED HOMES

6/6/2017 (Permalink)

About manufactured homes
Manufactured homes (sometimes called "mobile" homes) are transportable structures that are fixed to a chassis and specifically designed to be towed to a residential site. They are not the same as modular or prefabricated homes, which are factory-built and then towed in sections to be installed at a permanent location.

In order to distinguish between modular, prefabricated and recreational trailer homes, the following definition for a manufactured home from NFPA 501, Standard on Manufactured Housing, applies:

A structure, transportable in one or more sections that in the traveling mode is 8 body-ft (2.4 m) or more in width or 40 body-ft (12.2 m) or more in length or that on site is 320 ft2 (29.7m2) or more, is built on a permanent chassis, is designed to be used as a dwelling with or without a permanent foundation, whether or not connected to the utilities, and includes plumbing, heating, air-conditioning, and electrical systems contained therein. Such terms shall include any structure that meets all the requirements of this paragraph except the size requirements and with respect to which the manufacturer voluntarily files a certification required by the regulatory agency. Calculations used to determine the number of square feet in a structure are based on the structure’s exterior dimensions, include all expandable rooms, cabinets, and other projections containing interior space, but do not include bay windows.

The federal government regulates the construction of manufactured housing. Since 1976, manufactured homes have been required to comply with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) manufactured housing construction and safety standards, which cover a wide range of safety requirements, including fire safety. Post-1976 manufactured homes bear a label certifying compliance with these standards.

The HUD standard has been enhanced over the years and the HUD "Final Rule" for smoke alarms in manufactured homes is largely based upon NFPA 501. Today, new construction of manufactured housing is required to contain, among other provisions:

  • factory installed hard wired or 10 year battery source, interconnected smoke alarms with battery back-up (including alarms inside or immediately adjacent to all rooms designated as sleeping areas, top of the stairs and on the basement ceiling near the stairs)
  • provisions for special devices for hearing and visually impaired persons.

NFPA's national fire data indicate that manufactured homes built to HUD standards (post-1976 construction) have a much lower risk of death if fire occurs compared to pre-standard manufactured homes. The latest data (2007-2011) also shows that the overall fire death rate per 100,000 housing units is roughly the same for manufactured homes and for other one- or two-family homes.

Despite the federal requirements for factory-installed smoke alarms and the fact that eight out of ten manufactured homes now are and seven out of ten manufactured home fires now involve post-HUD-Standard units (based on 2007-2011 data), 51 percent of fires in manufactured homes were reported as having no smoke alarms present. This suggests a problem with detection devices being removed by occupants.

Safety tips
To increase fire safety in manufactured homes, NFPA offers the following guidelines:

  • Choose a HUD-certified manufactured home
    If you are in the market to purchase or rent a manufactured home, select a home built after 1976 that bears the HUD label certifying compliance with safety standards.
  • Keep smoke alarms working
    Never remove or disable a smoke alarm. If you experience frequent nuisance alarms, consider relocating the alarm further away from kitchen cooking fumes or bathroom steam. Selecting a photoelectric smoke alarm for the areas nearest kitchens and baths may reduce the number of nuisance alarms experienced. As an alternative, NFPA 501 permits a smoke alarm with a silencing means to be installed if it is within 20 feet of a cooking appliance. Test all smoke alarms at least once a month by pushing the "test" button. It is not necessary to use smoke or a real flame to test the smoke alarm's operability, and it is risky to do so. Replace batteries at least once a year, and when the alarm "chirps," signaling low battery power. Occasionally dust or lightly vacuum smoke alarms.
  • Make sure you have enough smoke alarms
    If your older manufactured home does not have smoke alarms in or near every sleeping room and in or near the family/living area(s), immediately install new alarms and fresh batteries to protect these rooms.  For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • Plan your escape
    Know ahead of time how you will get out if you have a fire. Develop an escape planwhich includes having an alternate exit out of every room. Make sure you can open and get out of windows and doors. All post-HUD Standard manufactured homes are required to provide windows designed for use as secondary escape routes for the bedroom. Familiarize yourself with their operation and don't block access to them.  Immediately fix any windows that have been painted or nailed shut, doors that are stubborn or "stuck," and locks that are difficult to operate. Security bars or grates over windows or doors should have quick-release devices installed inside, which allow you to open them in an emergency. Hold a fire drill twice a year to rehearse how you will react if the smoke alarm sounds.
  • Electrical
    Hire a licensed electrician if you notice flickering lights, frequent blown circuits, or a "hot" smell when using electricity. Use extension cords for temporary convenience, not as a permanent solution. Avoid overloading electrical receptacles (outlets). Electrical cords should not be run under carpets or rugs, as the wires can be damaged by foot traffic, then overheat and ignite the carpet or rug over them. Ground-fault circuit interrupters reduce the risk of electrical shock and should be installed by electricians in kitchens and baths. Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters monitor electric circuits for arcing and should be installed by electricians on bedroom circuits.
  • Cooking
    Unattended cooking is the leading cause of cooking fires in U.S. homes. Supervise older children who cook and stay in the kitchen when heating anything on the stove. Keep cooking surfaces clean and place anything that can burn well away from the range. Heat oil slowly and know how to slide a lid over a pan if you experience a grease fire. Read more cooking safety tips.
  • Heating
    Keep space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn. When purchasing new space heaters, select appliances with automatic shut-off switches. Kerosene heaters are illegal for home use in some jurisdictions. Check with your local fire department before purchasing a kerosene heater. Turn off portable space heaters before falling asleep or when leaving the room. Refill kerosene heaters outdoors, after the heater has cooled down. Supervise children and pets when space heaters are operating. Read more heating safety tips.
  • Walls
    All post-HUD Standard manufactured homes are required to have wall linings that do not promote rapid flame spread, with special protection around primary heating and cooking equipment, such as the furnace and cooking range. Presently, gypsum wallboard has replaced plywood wall paneling and wood based ceiling panels in the fabrication of manufactured housing walls and ceilings. This action has dramatically reduced the impact of fires in manufactured homes. Do not mount anything on the walls – such as paneling, drapery, or wall hangings – that would reduce this protection, especially near major heat sources.
  • Smoking
    If you have smokers in your home, ask them to smoke outside. Wherever people smoke, set out large, non-tip ashtrays on level surfaces and empty them frequently. Thoroughly douse butts with water before discarding. Check around and under cushions for smoldering butts. Read more smoking safety tips.
  • Protect yourself from intruders
    Install outdoor lighting to deter intruders, including would-be arsonists. Keep gasoline, charcoal lighter and other flammable liquids locked in an outdoor shed. Don't store items underneath your home. Store firewood away from your home and keep trash and other flammable debris cleaned up. Report any suspicious activity in your neighborhood.

http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/escape-planning/fire-safety-in-manufactured-homes

Pet Fire Safety Tips

6/6/2017 (Permalink)

  • Pets are curious. They may bump into, turn on, or knock over cooking equipment. Keep pets away from stoves and counter tops
  • Keep pets away from candles, lamps, and space heaters.
  • Always use a metal or heat-tempered glass screen on a fireplace and keep it in place.
  • Keep pets away from a chimney’s outside vents. Have a “pet-free zone” of at least 3 feet (1 meter) away from the fireplace. Glass doors and screens can stay dangerously hot for several hours after the fire goes out.
  • Consider battery-operated, flameless candles. They can look and smell like real candles.
  • Some pets are chewers. Watch pets to make sure they don’t chew through electrical cords. Have any problems checked by a professional.
  • Have working smoke alarms on every level of the home. Test your smoke alarms at least once a month.
  • If the smoke alarm sounds, get out and stay out.
  • Never go back inside for pets in a fire. Tell firefighters if your pet is trapped.

http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/safety-tip-sheets

Family Escape Plan

6/6/2017 (Permalink)

  • Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes.  Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors. Also, mark the location of each smoke alarm. This is a great way to get children involved in fire safety in a non-threatening way.
  • A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code® requires interconnected smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • Everyone in the household must understand the escape plan. When you walk through your plan, check to make sure the escape routes are clear and doors and windows can be opened easily.
  • Choose an outside meeting place (i.e. neighbor's house, a light post, mailbox, or stop sign) a safe distance in front of your home where everyone can meet after they've escaped. Make sure to mark the location of the meeting place on your escape plan.
  • Go outside to see if your street number is clearly visible from the road. If not, paint it on the curb or install house numbers to ensure that responding emergency personnel can find your home.
  • Have everyone memorize the emergency phone number of the fire department. That way any member of the household can call from a neighbor's home or a cellular phone once safely outside.
  • If there are infants, older adults, or family members with mobility limitations, make sure that someone is assigned to assist them in the fire drill and in the event of an emergency. Assign a backup person too, in case the designee is not home during the emergency.
  • If windows or doors in your home have security bars, make sure that the bars have emergency release devices inside so that they can be opened immediately in an emergency. Emergency release devices won't compromise your security - but they will increase your chances of safely escaping a home fire.
  • Tell guests or visitors to your home about your family's fire escape plan. When staying overnight at other people's homes, ask about their escape plan. If they don't have a plan in place, offer to help them make one. This is especially important when children are permitted to attend "sleepovers" at friends' homes. 
  • Be fully prepared for a real fire: when a smoke alarm sounds, get out immediately. Residents of high-rise and apartment buildingsmay be safer "defending in place."
  • Once you're out, stay out! Under no circumstances should you ever go back into a burning building. If someone is missing, inform the fire department dispatcher when you call. Firefighters have the skills and equipment to perform rescues.

http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/escape-planning/basic-fire-escape-planning

Fire Damage Restoration Is The First Step Towards Tomorrow

5/11/2017 (Permalink)

When smoke and flames consume a residence, trying to pick up the pieces and return to a normal life may seem like an impossible task. Fire damage restoration is the all-important first step in the process of rebuilding the structure and making it a livable space once again. The process of remediation after this kind of loss is time-sensitive and involves a number of steps. Finding a professional organization to perform this process can lessen financial stress and help property owners return to the home that they love.

Time Is Of The Essence

Fire damage restoration is a time-sensitive process. The passage of time will increase the impact in terms of the harm to property and belongings and the cost to return them to their former state. The initial impact of the flames is obvious; charred items show the results of the event. Water and chemical agents that were used to tamp down and contain the event also leave behind traces of how they were applied. However, there are other elements, less apparent but no less critical, that can dramatically increase the level of harm that has occurred.

The residual effects following a combustible event begin within minutes of the flames being doused and the smoke being cleared. Soot, ash, and odors can combine to discolor surfaces; corrode metallic objects, such as appliances and plumbing fixtures; and permanently stain fabrics, such as clothing and upholstery. As time passes, the long-term impact can be felt both in financial and emotional terms. Beginning the recovery process as soon as possible will help reduce the cost and the time required to begin a return to normalcy.

What Is Involved

A professional fire damage restoration team follows a number of steps in achieving the goal of returning the affected property to its former state. Below are highlights of this process.

Securing The Site

After a professional team is called to a location and performs an initial assessment, the location will be secured from the elements. This may involve windows and damaged walls being boarded up. If there is damage to the roof of a structure, a roof tarp may also be installed to prevent the elements from causing additional harm. It is important to note that protective clothing is utilized during the entire operation as team members can be exposed to potentially harmful elements that resulted from the occurrence.

Initial Removal Of Flame Retardant Items

Water and chemical agents used to control the event need to be removed from the location before additional work can be performed. Drying elements, such as dehumidifiers, are brought in to expedite the process. Large fans and other air moving devices will improve ventilation and make the area both easier and safer to perform the remediation.

Removing And Cleaning

The next phase of the procedure involves removing the residual soot and smoke odors from the premises. This is one of the most comprehensive steps, as it involves a thorough cleaning of all surfaces including walls, ceilings, floors, fixtures, and appliances. During this time, additional estimates can be made as to what can be restored and what must be replaced.

Sanitizing and deep cleaning will help bring items back to the condition that they were in before being damaged in the event. This step can also result in significant cost savings both to the homeowner and the insurance company involved.

Restoration And Replacement

The final step in fire damage restoration is dealing with any structural damage. Installing new flooring, repainting, and similar activities will be undertaken at this time. If portions of the property need to be rebuilt, this can also be completed during this phase.

Items such as appliances and fixtures that are too impacted to be restored will be replaced with new functional equivalents so that the property can once again be a home to those who lived there.

 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Andrew_Stratton/83489 


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9369414

Powering Through the Fire Damage Restoration Process

5/2/2017 (Permalink)

Your home is partially damaged in a blaze, but fortunately, you will be able to move back in. Undergoing professional fire damage restoration will save you from having to figure out how to dry carpets, drapery, and furniture, remove soot, and repair structural damage. During this tumultuous time, you and your family will be able to take control by following these tips.

Names and Contact Information

Get a folder and a notebook and be prepared to hoard everything related to the fire. Write down the name and contact information of every helpful person you encounter. Continue using the notebook to track financial transactions and conversations with insurance representatives, contractors, and all other related interactions. Be sure to write the date, time, full name, subject, and next steps for each conversation. Put the business cards, reports, forms, contracts, etc. you receive in the folder. Knowing the status of all aspects of recovery will help you feel powerful in a time of despair.

Let People Know About Your Situation

When family and friends hear the news, they will want to help! Tell them what you need and be specific. If your clothing is not salvageable, let them see the specific sizes and types you want. Many people use crowdfunding websites to arrange donations and tell their stories. Some choose registries that allow people to purchase specific items. Use pictures of the damage to show the need. The more your loved ones know, the better they can direct support.

Don't forget to keep track of donations so you can follow up with a Thank You when you are back on your feet. You will also want to arrange a storage space for donated items while you wait to move home.

Temporary Housing

If you do not have anywhere to stay while your home is undergoing fire damage restoration, reach out to local hotels to see if they offer free nights for fire survivors. Take advantage of emergency and recovery organizations. They will help you access a web of connections and available necessities.

Salvaging Keepsakes

You've survived physically unharmed, but what about your belongings? When fire damage restoration professionals allow you to enter your home, you will want to find and remove the most treasured items. After photo-documenting everything you can safely approach, remove the items you want to keep in large plastic bags.

When you find documents that are wet and stuck together, float them in a tub of water to separate them. Follow up by hanging to dry or laying out on a flat surface.

Clothing and furniture that may be smoke damaged should be checked by your fire damage restoration consultants to help you decide whether to keep or toss them. You can treat smoke-scented clothing by soaking and washing in a mixture of water and vinegar.

Make Your Claim

After you have photographed your home, make a list of everything you have lost. Think of your house room by room to make sure you are not missing anything. Work with your family to ensure all perspectives are included. Create a table that includes the name, value, approximate date purchased, and retailer for each item. It is preferable to do this in digital form so you can update easily and share with your insurance agent.

 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9400976